Nutscene - Jute Sacks
Green Trees

Jute Sacks

6.00

Out of stock

Description:
Product Reference: Jute Sacks

Designed by Scottish based Nutscene, this trusted garden classic has been used by gardeners and crafters since 1922. These traditional, robust hessian storage sacks are suitable for carrying and storing foliage or collecting garden waste. Our Clean, Strong and Durable jute hessian sacks can be reused many times and even disposed of by burying in the garden due to being biodegradable!!

Heritage

Nutscene® has been producing and manufacturing Jute Twine since 1922.  Our twine is 100% biodegradable, safe to compost, recyclable and harvested from renewable resources for over 90 years.

Specs

- Made in Angus, Scotland
- Material: Natural Jute Fibres
- Size: 830 x 500mm
- Set of two sacks
- Safe to compost and harvested from renewable resources

Category:

Description

Jute Sacks

Jute Sacks is a long, soft, shiny vegetable fiber that can be spun into coarse, strong threads. It is produced primarily from plants in the genus Corchorus, which was once classified with the family Tiliaceae, and more recently with Malvaceae. The primary source of the fiber is Corchorus olitorius, but it is considered inferior to Corchorus capsularis.[1] “Jute” is the name of the plant or fiber used to make burlap, hessian or gunny cloth.

Jute is one of the most affordable natural fibers, and second only to cotton in the amount produced and variety of uses. Jute fibers are composed primarily of the plant materials cellulose and lignin. It falls into the bast fiber category (fiber collected from bast, the phloem of the plant, sometimes called the “skin”) along with kenaf, industrial hemp, flax (linen), ramie, etc. The industrial term for jute fiber is raw jute. The fibers are off-white to brown, and 1–4 metres (3–13 feet) long. Jute is also called the golden fiber for its color and high cash value.

Jute matting is used to prevent flood erosion while natural vegetation becomes established. For this purpose, a natural and biodegradable fiber is essential.

Jute is the second most important vegetable fiber after cotton due to its versatility. Jute is used chiefly to make cloth for wrapping bales of raw cotton, and to make sacks and coarse cloth. The fibers are also woven into curtains, chair coverings, carpets, area rugs, hessian cloth, and backing for linoleum.

While jute is being replaced by synthetic materials in many of these uses,[citation needed] some uses take advantage of jute’s biodegradable nature, where synthetics would be unsuitable. Examples of such uses include containers for planting young trees, which can be planted directly with the container without disturbing the roots, and land restoration where jute cloth prevents erosion occurring while natural vegetation becomes established.